Curriculum and assessment changes

It is critical our education system continues to evolve and remains focussed on delivering equitable and excellent outcomes for all Aotearoa New Zealand’s children and young people. 

A five-year programme to refresh the New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa is underway, aimed at ensuring all ākonga experience rich and responsive learning.

View a te reo Māori translation of this page [DOCX, 35 KB]

These changes will also honour our past and obligations to Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

At the same time, changes are taking place or have been proposed, for early learning and NCEA. The changes follow extensive engagement and consultation with the education sector, communities and learners throughout New Zealand.

We have developed a series of infographic timelines that illustrate key milestones for curriculum and assessment work occurring across early learning and schooling. They comprise:

Indicative timelines (2021-2025)

 

English language

Te reo Māori

Accessible version

(English language)

Accessible version

(te reo Māori)

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki (2017)

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki text narrative – English [PDF, 91 KB]

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki text narrative – te reo Māori [PDF, 93 KB]

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki text timeline – English [DOCX, 23 KB]

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki text timeline –  te reo Māori [DOCX, 27 KB]

Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum

Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum – English [PDF, 92 KB]

Refreshing The New Zealand Curriculum – te reo Māori [PDF, 95 KB]

Refreshing the NZ Curriculum text timeline – English [DOCX, 20 KB]

Refreshing the NZ Curriculum text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 23 KB]

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa – English [PDF, 91 KB]

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa – te reo Māori [PDF, 96 KB]

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa_English text timeline [DOCX, 20 KB]

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa – te reo Māori text timeline [DOCX, 21 KB]

NCEA Change Programme

 

NCEA Change Programme infographic timeline – English [PDF, 92 KB]

NCEA Change Programme infographic timeline – te reo Māori [PDF, 93 KB]

NCEA Change Programme text timeline – English [DOCX, 23 KB]

NCEA Change Programme text timeline –  te reo Māori [DOCX, 27 KB]

Combined timeline: NCEA Change programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum

NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum (2021-2025)(external link)

Combined timeline: NCEA Change programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum - te reo Māori(external link) NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum (2021-2025) [DOCX, 27 KB] NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum – text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 36 KB]

Combined timeline: NCEA Change programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa (2021-2025)(external link)

Combined timeline: NCEA Change programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa - te reo Māori(external link) NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa (2021-2025) [DOCX, 25 KB] NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa– text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 33 KB]

Review of Vocational Education

Review of Vocational Education – English [PDF, 72 KB]

Review of Vocational Education – te reo Māori [PDF, 71 KB] Review of Vocational Education text timeline – English [DOCX, 17 KB] Review of Vocational Education text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 20 KB]

These infographics are designed to provide clarity about when different pieces of work are scheduled. However, these timelines will remain flexible to meet any evolving demands and priorities within the sector.

We know you want assurance that support will be in place to help changes occur with minimum disruption and this will remain a priority for us.

Te Mahau (formerly referred to as Education Service Agency) will lead this work, engaging and partnering with the sector to support delivery of the changes as part of the Government’s agreed response to the independent review of Tomorrow’s Schools.

We have been asked for clarity on:

  1. the scale of changes and support available to make them successful
  2. opportunities for engagement
  3. how the curriculum refreshes work with NCEA changes
  4. how the changes to curriculum and NCEA work with the Review of Vocational Education.

Changes and support

The infographic timelines capture work occurring out to 2025. They show that changes are not happening all at once and will occur over time in partnership with the sector.

There will be opportunities throughout the planning and implementation of these changes for elements to be rephased and/or reprioritised if needed.

At the same time this work is happening, Te Poutāhū | Curriculum Centre is being established within the new Te Mahau.

Opportunities for engagement

The work programmes outlined in these timelines are being designed in consultation with the sector, and that collaborative process and partnership will continue. 

To help you see this, we have produced an infographic that shows the different sector working groups that have been established or engaged to work with us.

Sector reach, advice and input [PDF, 189 KB]

How the curriculum refreshes work with NCEA changes

The work of refreshing the National Curriculum and delivering the NCEA changes are well aligned. We are working collaboratively with the secondary sector and communities on both the curriculum and NCEA changes.

The National Curriculum underpins all learning. The curriculum refresh aims to update and provide clarity about the big ideas and the expected learning within each learning area from Years 1 to 13. The curriculum refresh will also acknowledge that senior secondary students:

  • engage with more specialised learning framed around subjects,
  • can access vocational learning and assessments, and
  • are beginning high-stakes national assessments and working towards qualifications.

A refreshed New Zealand Curriculum will support ākonga on their pathway into senior secondary years and beyond by creating better connections between curriculum learning areas at the earlier years and subject-specific learning at the later years. This will create a continuous learning experience for ākonga to develop the foundation they need for success throughout education, and in national qualifications.

The National Curriculum Refresh and the NCEA Change Programme are progressing in tandem, and the changes are being phased in over the next four to five years. Several important changes are already being implemented but we know that meaningful change takes time. Throughout this period, we are committed to ensuring all ākonga have fair assessments based on their learning to date.

In 2020, prior to decisions on the National Curriculum Refresh, the Ministry commissioned experts to create prototype curriculum ‘big ideas’ and purpose statements. These were developed to guide the development of new achievement standards for NCEA, by providing more detail than was available in the existing essence statements and learning area sections of the New Zealand Curriculum.

These prototypes have:

  • informed the standards that are being publicly consulted on
  • provided the basis for each learning area update, and for how significant learning is identified and described for each of the subjects derived from that learning area

Across both the curriculum and NCEA, we are working towards having most of the new content available by the end of 2023, with iterative releases each year leading up this (the following timeline has more detail on the timing of this work). A phase of trialling and refinement will continue beyond this.

Further changes to some of the new assessment standards within NCEA subjects might be needed over time to strengthen the alignment with the national curriculum, and to reflect evolving teaching and learning practices. These will be done over time, as part of ongoing review and maintenance of the qualification.

How the changes to curriculum and NCEA work with the Review of Vocational Education

The Reform of Vocational Education (RoVE) is creating a strong vocational education system that is fit for the future of work. Schools and kura remain crucial to the future of vocational education, including providing students with opportunities and support to navigate their learning pathway and progress towards their goals.

Reform of Vocational Education (RoVE)(external link)

Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga | The Ministry of Education, the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA), and the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) are working together to ensure the RoVE supports schools, kura, and tertiary education organisations to be better linked to each other and to the world of work. We are also working to align the implementation of the RoVE changes with the changes to NCEA and the National Curriculum. 

RoVE is currently focused on establishing the new entities and systems that will set standards and deliver vocational education going forward, including Workforce Development Councils, and Te Pūkenga – New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology. This work will be ongoing until the end of 2022, as the new entities plan their priorities, work plans, and offerings. In the meantime, our priority is ensuring that disruption to schools, kura and students is minimised.

For schools and kura, our message is simple: keep seeking opportunities to grow and expand your vocational education options. The unit standards you use will still be available. The Vocational Pathways will continue to be maintained. The partnerships you already have will continue, or you will be supported to partner with new organisations as transitions occur.

From 2022 onwards, the Ministry will work with the new organisations to help them strengthen the vocational options available to your schools, kura and students. Over time new standards, products and services will be made available to expand the opportunities available to your students. This will include the phased introduction of changes to the Vocational Pathways and implementation of the Vocational Entrance Award, from 2023 onwards subject to Ministerial decisions later this year.

Indicative timelines (2021-2025)

Please find links below to the infographic timelines that illustrate key milestones for curriculum and assessment work, and an infographic showing the different sector advisory and reference groups that have been established or engaged to work with us:

Indicative timeline (2021-2025)

 

English language

Te reo Māori

Accessible version

(English language)

Accessible version

(te reo Māori)

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki (2017)

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki text narrative –English [PDF, 91 KB]

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki text narrative –te reo Māori [PDF, 93 KB]

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki text timeline – English [DOCX, 23 KB]

Supporting the implementation of Te Whāriki text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 27 KB]

Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum

Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum – English [PDF, 92 KB]

Refreshing The New Zealand Curriculum – te reo Māori [PDF, 95 KB]

Refreshing the NZ Curriculum text timeline – English [DOCX, 20 KB]

Refreshing the NZ Curriculum text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 23 KB]

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa – English [PDF, 91 KB]

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa – te reo Māori [PDF, 96 KB]

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa – English text timeline [DOCX, 20 KB]

Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa – te reo Māori text timeline [DOCX, 21 KB]

NCEA Change Programme

 

NCEA Change Programme infographic timeline – English [PDF, 92 KB]

NCEA Change Programme infographic timeline – te reo Māori [PDF, 93 KB]

NCEA Change Programme text timeline – English [DOCX, 23 KB]

NCEA Change Programme text timeline –  te reo Māori [DOCX, 27 KB] [DOCX, 26 KB]

Combined timeline: NCEA Change programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum

NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum (2021-2025)(external link)

Combined timeline: NCEA Change programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum - te reo Māori(external link) NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum (2021-2025) [DOCX, 27 KB] NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing the New Zealand Curriculum – text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 36 KB]

Combined timeline: NCEA Change programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa (2021-2025)(external link) Combined timeline: NCEA Change programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa - te reo Māori(external link) NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa (2021-2025) [DOCX, 25 KB] NCEA Change Programme and Refreshing Te Marautanga o Aotearoa– text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 33 KB]

Review of Vocational Education

Review of Vocational Education – English [PDF, 72 KB] Review of Vocational Education – te reo Māori [PDF, 71 KB] Review of Vocational Education text timeline – English [DOCX, 17 KB] Review of Vocational Education text timeline – te reo Māori [DOCX, 20 KB]

Associate Minister of Education, Jan Tinetti, outlines the benefits of the refresh in this video.


Associate Minister of Education, Jan Tinetti video transcript

Tēnā koutou katoa

We signalled back in September 2019 that we were working on improving the national curriculum for schooling, Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and The New Zealand Curriculum. I’m excited to announce today the process and timing for updating the curriculum over the next five years, beginning with Aotearoa New Zealand’s Histories.

I know parents want more certainty about what their tamariki will learn in schools and kura, and that the curriculum should also focus on wellbeing, identity, language and culture.

Learners want to learn from a curriculum that is meaningful to them and their whānau.

Teachers want to be clear about what their students need to learn, how they are making progress, their strengths and where support is needed. A record of learning that travels with students will capture this information consistently.

Since 2019, when Minister Hipkins first signalled the need for change, the Ministry has been working with people from the education sector and wider communities to really understand how to make the improvements we need to ensure our students succeed. 

We’ve been looking carefully at the current curriculum in order to be clearer about the knowledge, skills and capabilities learners need to progress through their schooling.

While COVID impacted progress in 2020, we have been able to build momentum with implementing professional learning development priorities to better support schools to develop their local curriculum. We have also established curriculum leads to strengthen curriculum support at the Ministry’s frontline. These roles will start to work in schools in term 2 this year. 

In 2021, we’re going to work with the sector on the new framing of both Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and The New Zealand Curriculum to ensure that it’s clear what our learners need to know, understand and do in order to be successful now and in the future. 

An example of the proposed changes to the national curriculum can be seen in the draft curriculum content for Aotearoa New Zealand’s histories and Te Takanga o te Wa. This year draft content is being trialled so it is ready to be taught in schools in 2022.

Alongside the curriculum changes, the Ministry has been working with educators, whānau and young people about a more holistic approach to a record of learning that will travel with learners throughout their learning. A digital record of learning will be collaborated generated so that parents, whānau and teachers have a comprehensive tool to understand progress. This will start with a focus on literacy, numeracy, social wellbeing, te reo matatini, pāngarau and He Tamaiti Hei Raukura. Trialling will begin later in 2021.

During 2021-25, we will be strengthening Te Marautanga o Aotearoa in partnership with whānau, hapū and iwi will continue to ensure marau ā-kura reflects the vision and aspirations that whānau have for their tamariki to form the basis of their marau ā-kura. This means Te Marautanga o Aotearoa will recognise a broader definition of success and equip all learners with the essential knowledge, skills and values to operate confidently in te ao Māori and the wider world.

The important shift for Te Marautanga o Aotearoa is to address equity, trust and coherence through integration of He Tamaiti Hei Raukura as the underpinningframework that recognises tamariki and rangatahi as uri whakahere (as a descendant), tangata (as a person), puna kōrero (as a communicator), and as an ākonga (as a learner). Te Marautanga o Aotearoa will continue to embody te ao Māori and will be strengthened to reflect a more authentic and indigenous curriculum. 

Learners and whānau will, therefore, be able to see themselves reflected in their learning and future pathways.

For The New Zealand Curriculum, during 2021-25 we will refresh each learning area and develop supports to ensure effective implementation. We’ll be working to reduce the large number of achievement objectives we have in the current curriculum and develop a smaller number of progress statements to make sure our learners are reaching the milestones they need to. This year we will start with the social sciences learning area in order to support the implementation of the Aotearoa NZ histories in 2022.

We will design a truly connected curriculum by bringing together the key competencies with the learning areas. Up until now, teachers have been left to navigate the key competencies, bringing them to life within learning areas. Our refreshed New Zealand curriculum will bring these together, making it easier for teachers and engaging for learners.

We need our curriculum to be clear and support the design of high quality marau ā-kura and local curriculum – striking a balance between the learning that is important nationally and learning that reflects the rohe.

I know we need to support teachers to successfully put these changes in place. That’s why we’re committed to a collaborative process of co-design.

Some of you will be very keen for more detail on all the changes we are making and how you can be involved. You can get more information for each curriculum on the Ministry website. There’s plenty more detail of what will be reviewed and when, so keep checking back as we progress. You’ll also be able to have your say there.

During my time in education, my work in dual medium schools gave me an understanding of the changes needed in the curriculum. I agree with the need for change and am eager to support a refreshed Aotearoa New Zealand curriculum that is bicultural, easier to use and ensures clarity and consistency for our teachers.

So, exciting times ahead and a lot of work to do! I know student success is at the heart of why teachers come to work every day. We can’t do this without you!

Support and resources

This curriculum refresh will touch on all areas, including foundational learning such as literacy and mathematics for English-medium pathways and te reo matatini and pāngarau for Māori-medium pathways. We are now working on new strategies for these foundational areas from early learning through to Year 13.

It’s essential that teachers and kaiako have the right tools and know how to implement the refreshed national curriculum framework so that they can design rich and relevant learning experiences for all ākonga.

New resources will be developed to support teaching and learning, including leadership guidance and sets of teaching and learning materials for teachers.

Curriculum leads will support leaders and teachers to use the refreshed national curriculum and to design their marau ā-kura and local curriculum.

In 2020, new priorities for regionally-allocated professional learning and development were implemented to support teachers to provide responsive and rich learning experiences for all ākonga.

Read the priorities for regionally-allocated PLD(external link)

Strengthened Networks of Expertise will also provide vital support for teachers and leaders. Collaborative inquiry is one of the most powerful ways to influence change and practices that best support teaching and learning. Positive change can come about for individual learners, their communities and at a system level.

Read about Networks of Expertise(external link)

Much of the thinking for the curriculum refresh is currently being piloted in the draft Aoteaora New Zealand’s histories curriculum content. The changes will build on each other iteratively across the five-year refresh journey so preparing for the implementation of Aoteaora New Zealand’s histories will support getting ready for the wider refresh. See what supporting resources are already available to get you started.

Aotearoa New Zealand’s histories(external link)

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