Principles - Ka Hikitia

 

Treaty of Waitangi

The Treaty of Waitangi is one the 5 guiding principles of Ka Hikitia - Accelerating Success 2013-2017. This principal emphasises that every Māori student has the potential to make a valuable social, cultural and economic contribution to the well-being of their whānau, their community and New Zealand as a whole.

Makoura College

“We had what we would term, a poverty of spirit.”

Newton Central

“We have what we would describe as a Treaty based co-governance.” “...the generosity of the Māori community to walk with the non-Māori community in a learning journey.”

Breens Intermediate

“As a leader you sit and you spend a lot of time looking out the window looking for solutions or ideas when in fact you need to probably be looking in the mirror having a good hard look at yourself.”

Porangahau

“The best thing is we are all different too, but we still all come together as a community with our children.”

“Whānau is the key and that is what makes it easy.”

Te Karaka

“The Treaty of Waitangi plays a major role in our role as board members.”

“Just to hear their korero about the hapū iwi, how everything comes together here.”

Makoura College: Treaty of Waitangi, Māori potential approach, Identity, language and culture, Productive partnerships (0:00-3:03)

  • What significant events if any have shaped the current climate at our school?
  • In what ways are the current relationships internally and externally, educationally powerful for our Māori learners?
  • How are our Māori learners and communities represented within the school environment?

Newton Central School: Treaty of Waitangi, Productive partnerships (4:19-5:00)

  • What Māori representation currently exists on our BOTs?
  • What policies, procedures and practices are in place to affirm this partnership?
  • How do we retain, maintain and sustain the essence of the Treaty in all aspects of our school?

Newton Central School: Treaty of Waitangi, Productive partnerships (6:42-end)

  • What is the vision for Māori learners at our school?
  • Who can assist us to achieve this vision?
  • How will we monitor, report and modify actions to achieve this vision?

Breens Intermediate: Treaty of Waitangi, Māori potential approach, Productive partnerships (0:00-2:33)

  • How are Māori learners, their parents, families and whānau engaged with our school?
  • How does this engagement support educationally powerful relationships?
  • What are the core values of our school?
  • How are these values linked to the goals, targets, plans and actions we have for our school?

Porangahau School: Treaty of Waitangi, Productive partnerships (1:23-1:50)

  • How do we know what is best for our Māori students?
  • In what ways does our school honour the Treaty of Waitangi?
  • What is the relationship between parents, family whānau and school?

Porangahau School: Treaty of Waitangi, Productive partnerships (3:35-4:05)

  • Who is part of the community that supports the school and learners?
  • How do we assist parents, family or whānau into our school?
  • How can we as parents, family and whānau connect with the school?

Te Karaka: Treaty of Waitangi, Identity, language and culture (0:00-1:54)

  • How do we build relationships in our school?
  • What do we know about where our Māori students come from?
  • What do we know about the Māori from where our school sits?

Te Karaka: Treaty of Waitangi, Identity, language and culture (1:55-2:26)

  • How do we know what is best for our Māori learners?
  • In what ways does our school honour the Treaty of Waitangi?
  • How do we support and strengthen our staff and students cultural competency?

Māori Potential Approach

The Treaty of Waitangi is one the 5 guiding principles of Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013-2017. This principal emphasises the power of collaboration and the value of working closely with iwi and Māori organisations to lift the performance of the education system.

Makoura College

“We like to think that every student at Makoura College has their own waka huia, and inside the waka huia is their own treasure, and it’s about promoting that and bringing it out.”

“We sat at 100% pass rate at level 1 for our Māori students which were one of the highest in the country.”

Newton Central

“...the fact that they are Māori, that they can speak two languages and that is a skill that not everybody in this country has.”

Breens Intermediate

“Māori success is expected, whānau and iwi they understand this, they get it, they are engaged at all levels, board level right though to student led conferencing...”

Porangahau

“This is all tikanga Māori as far as I’m concerned...”

“We have to make ourselves available and voluntarily do that.”

Te Karaka

“... really important that we make sure that we are seeing Māori success as across the board not just in those tight areas of National Standards...”

“Looking at those children on an individual basis and saying what do they need and what do they want?”

Makoura College: Māori potential approach, Identity, language and culture and Ako (3:03-5:10)

  • How does our school visualise Māori potential?
  • What do you know about the potential of the Māori students in your class/school?
  • How will your team/school/BOTs support Māori students to build on their potential?

(6:50–end)

 

  • What do we know about the achievement of our Māori students?
  • What factors contribute to or have influenced this data?
  • In what ways do we celebrate the academic success of our learners?
  • How is this success communicated to parents, families, whānau and the wider Māori community?

Newton Central: Māori potential approach, Identity, language and culture (2:20-3:31) (translate from 00:39-end 1:06)

  • How much do we know about the skill, values and attitudes our Māori learners possess that are celebrated and upheld by our school?
  • How many languages can you speak? (the staff, BOTs, community)

Breens Intermediate: Māori potential approach, Treaty of Waitangi, Productive partnerships (0:00-2:33)

  • How are Māori learners, their parents, families and whānau engaged with our school?
  • How does this engagement support educationally powerful relationships?
  • What are the core values of our school?
  • How are these values linked to the goals, targets, plans and actions we have for our school?

Porangahau School: Maori Potential Approach, Ako, Identity, Language and Culture (1:50–2:15, 2:15–3:19)

  • How do we assist students to return back to school and begin the week?
  • How are peer relationships used to support students to feel connected to our school and how do we know?
  • How is tikanga Māori alive in our school?

(4:05–4:57)

  • What expectation do we have for our staff, parents, families, whānau or community to lead or support Māori activities or tikanga?
  • How do we as a school acknowledge that level of commitment from our community?
  • In what ways are our school community developing and strengthening our own cultural competencies?

Te Karaka: Māori potential approach, Ako (4:43–5:42)

  • What are the targets for our Māori learners?
  • How do we measure the success of Māori learners as Māori?
  • What do we know about the effect of our school environment on the learning of our Māori students?

(5:42–6:30)

  • How do we know what our students want?
  • What types of access do our students have to teachers/BOTs/Principal/senior managers/whānau and the wider community?
  • How do we strengthen our students’ ability to select their career pathways?

Ako – two-way teaching and learning process

Ako is one the 5 guiding principles of Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013-2017. This principal emphasises a dynamic form of learning grounded in the principle of reciprocity. Ako seeks and reflects what Māori know and value.

Makoura College

 “It put the heat on staff to lift their game...”

 “...they were able to use that context to get those students to realise that literacy and numeracy was going to be really important.”

Newton Central

“We run a programme that is all around those values and tikanga that are most important to us...”

Breens Intermediate

“Here at Breens we have got 3 little hapū of teams.”

 “We have a tuakana teina wall, on one side is our strengths on the other side is our weaknesses...”

Porangahau

“They can individualise each child in the classroom...”

Te Karaka

“One of our main aims in the last three years that we have been open has been to engage, re-engage these learners in learning.”

“Kids have got a really good understanding of their learning”

Newton Central: Ako, Identity, language and culture and Māori potential approach (1:10-1:53)

  • How much do we know about the skill, values and attitudes our Māori learners possess that are celebrated and upheld by our school?
  • How many languages can you speak? (the staff, BOTs, community)

Breens Intermediate: Ako, Māori potential approach (2:34–5:13)

  • How are the classes in our school organised?
  • How is achievement tracked for Māori learners?
  • Does the current learning environment support all students and how do you know this?

(5:14–6:42)

  • What does a Māori potential approach look like in our class/school?
  • Who has ownership of learning and teaching in our class/school?
  • How do we work to the strengths of our Māori students?

Porangahau School: Ako, Productive partnerships (4:57–5:20)

  •  What do I know about the Māori learners in my class/school?
  • What type of strategies do we use to assist our Māori learners?
  • In what ways do you share teaching and learning opportunities in your class/school?

Te Karaka: Ako, Identity, language and culture (3:20–4:04)

  • How do we engage our Māori learners with the curriculum?
  • How do we know that this is working for our learners?
  • In what ways do we let our learners lead their learning journeys?

(2:26–3:19)

  • How is ownership of learning retained by the students?
  • How do we report to our Māori parents, family, whānau or community?
  • How do we know that this reporting is effective?

Makoura College: Ako, Productive partnerships (5:10–6:15)

  • In what ways do our Māori learners have ownership of their learning?
  • How does our school integrate learning opportunities into our already busy school timetable?
  • In what ways do we celebrate Māori learner achievement?

(6:15–6:50)

  • How does our school support Māori learners as they transition in and out of our school?
  • What do we know about the engagement, attendance and retention of our Māori learners in my class/school?
  • What do we know about the interests of our Māori learners?

Identity, language and culture

Identity, language and culture is one the five guiding principles of Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013-2017. This principal emphasises that learners do better in education when what and how they learn reflects and positively reinforces where they come from, what they value and what they already know. Learning is valid when it connects with students’ existing knowledge.

Makoura College

“In 2008 the school was threatened with closure, we have had consecutive negative ERO reports...”

Newton Central

“So for me inclusion of identity, language and culture is about saving lives and futures.”

“Taonga tuku iho”

Breens Intermediate

“I try and use the strengths of my Māori learners, so that they can feel as though they belong, their language is a taonga...”

Porangahau

“We also engage children in stories and the history of the area.”

Te Karaka

“It is important that we see Māori achieving as Māori across the board.”

Newton Central: Identity, language and culture, Productive partnerships (0:00–1:10)

  • How do we develop a culture of trust if it does not exist in our school?
  • What do we know about the educational benefits of a strong connection to our identity, language and culture?
  • What is it we value about our own cultures?

(1:53–2:20)

  • What is normal in our school?
  • Do you see the world the same way as the Māori learners in your class/school?
  • What learning factors do we see as being critical to our Māori learners?

Breens Intermediate: Identity, language and culture, Treaty of Waitangi (6:42–8:29)

  • How does our school use Ka Hikitia, Tātaiako or Hautū?
  • What lessons can be taken from our conversations about our own identity, language and culture?
  • What role does professional learning development play in improving the quality of teaching and the use of identity, language and culture to strengthen Māori learner achievement?

Porangahau School: Identity, language and culture, Ako, Productive partnerships (7:00–end)

  • Do we know where our Māori learners come from?
  • What do we know about the history of the area and the school?
  • In what ways do we strengthen Māori learners’ access to their identity, language and culture?

Te Karaka: Identity, language and culture, Māori potential approach (4:43–5:42)

  • What does Māori learner success look like at our school?
  • What do parents; family and whānau think success looks like in our school?
  • In what ways does using the identity, language and culture of our students affect their learning?

Makoura College: Identity, language and culture, Treaty of Waitangi, Māori potential approach, Productive partnerships (0:00–3:03)

  • What do you know about the identity, language and culture of your class/school?
  • In what ways has the perception of the wider community shaped our school?
  • How can our understanding of the identity, language and culture of our Māori learners accelerate their success?

Productive partnerships

Productive partnerships is one the 5 guiding principles of Ka Hikitia – Accelerating Success 2013-2017. This principal emphasises that a productive partnership starts by understanding that Māori children and students are connected to whānau and should not be viewed or treated as separate, isolated or disconnected.   

Makoura College

“We worked hard to turn the place around; a lot of it was looking at how we build on the relationships with our community...”

Newton Central

“Any change that will significantly impact on whānau must come from whānau.”

“Often what’s missing in these discussions is how do we integrate language, culture and identity into our schools, how do Māori live as Māori?”

Breens Intermediate

“The research was telling us an awful lot around the fact that we need to be really connected with our whānau...”

Porangahau

“Effective partnerships are with staff, with board and with all parents.”

“I think if you want children to succeed you have to eliminate barriers”

“We have instigated a programme where children can come into school for up to six months before they’re five.”

Te Karaka

“The Board know that what the teachers are doing here and what the school is doing is really working...”

Newton Central: Productive partnerships (3:31–4:19)

  • In what ways do parents, families and whānau drive the changes in our school?
  • How will we change the hearts and minds of our school to accelerate success for Māori learners?
  • How do the relationships in our school community educationally powerful?

(5:21-6:42)

  • What does success as Māori mean at our school?
  • How are Māori aspirations represented at a BOTs level?
  • How effective is our current governance model for Māori enjoying and achieving education success as Māori?

Breens Intermediate: Productive partnerships, Treaty of Waitangi, Māori potential approach (0:00–2:33)

  • How are Māori learners, their parents, families and whānau engaged with our school?
  • How does this engagement support educationally powerful relationships?
  • In what ways to parents, families and whānau contribute to the vision of our school?

Porangahau School: Productive partnerships (0:00-1:23)

  • What effective partnerships do we have in our school community?
  • What relationships exist in our school that support Māori learners to accelerate their success?
  • In what ways do we assist our parents, families and whānau to ensure learners can attend our school?

(3:19–3:34)

  • What barriers exist for our students to access our school?
  • In what ways can we remove or limit these barriers?
  • How committed are our staff and BOT to building and strengthening the effective communities of our school?

(6:00–6:19)

  • How do we support Māori learners to transition into and out of our school?
  • How do we provide information to our school community to support education success?
  • What information and or access do we provide to parents, families and whānau about beginning at our school?

Te Karaka: Productive partnerships (7:42–end)

  • What information about Māori learners is received by the BOTs?
  • What do we know about the attendance, engagement and retention of our Māori learners?
  • In what ways does using the identity, language and culture of our students affect their learning?

Makoura College: Productive partnerships (0:00–3:03)

  • What relationships exist in our class/school?
  • How do the relationships within the wider school community impact on our Māori learners?
  • How do we include Māori representation in the decision making about the vision of our school?

 

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