Get involved in 'The New Zealand Curriculum' refresh

Kia ora, Kia Orana, Mālō e lelei, Talofa lava, Mālō nī, Fakaalofa lahi atu, 안녕하세요, 大家好, नमस्त and warm greetings.

In Aotearoa New Zealand, let’s have a future where every child experiences success in their learning.

Over the next five years, we’re refreshing 'The New Zealand Curriculum'. It’s vital that all ākonga experience a sense of wellbeing and belonging in their schooling. This refresh will support teachers to design curriculum that fits the uniqueness of every learner - so that every child’s progress and achievement is responded to and celebrated.

The refreshed national curriculum will provide a greater sense of what progress looks like, and the learning that matters. We will all have clarity about the learning that ākonga should experience across the curriculum – what is important to understand, know, and do. This clarity will strengthen partnerships between teachers, kaiako, and leaders to work with ākonga, their family and whānau, and the wider community including hapū and iwi to develop rich and relevant local curriculum.

We are intent on empowering teachers and leaders to ensure every young person leaves school with the skills, capabilities, and knowledge they need to fulfil their potential.

The Kōrero Matauranga | Education Conversation gave us a detailed picture of the inequities and barriers faced by ākonga, their families and whānau. This, alongside the recommendations from the Curriculum, Progress and Achievement Ministerial Advisory Group, provided us with clear direction from you about what works, and the changes needed in the areas of curriculum, teaching and assessment.

We want to make sure that the needs of all ākonga are considered in this refresh, and that we engage with your collective wisdom, knowledge, and expertise on these changes. Check out the indicative timeline for opportunities to get involved!

It’s time to make a shift. Be part of the change!

We want the best for all ākonga, and future generations.

To create this future, the goals for 'The New Zealand Curriculum' refresh and support for teaching and learning are to:

  1. Honour our mutual obligations to and through Te Tiriti o Waitangi
  2. Create curriculum that is inclusive so that all ākonga see themselves, and succeed in their learning
  3. Make sure 'The New Zealand Curriculum' is clear about the learning that matters
  4. Make sure 'The New Zealand Curriculum' is easy to use for teachers.

Snapshot of what's changing(external link)

What is National Curriculum?

In the context of school settings across Aotearoa, 'The New Zealand Curriculum' sets out the expectations and requirements for teaching and learning. It contains the learning that all ākonga should experience in New Zealand schools.

What is Local Curriculum?

Local Curriculum is how to interpret and present 'The New Zealand Curriculum' to ākonga in schools, making it relevant to their current and future lives – their strengths, aspirations and needs.

School leadership work out how to shape their local curriculum by collaborating with ākonga, parents, whānau, hapū, iwi and their wider community.

The purpose of Local Curriculum is to be explicit and intentional in delivering teaching and learning to meet the needs of ākonga and their families and whānau.

By working together, we can all create the necessary shifts needed so that all ākonga succeed in their learning”

Pauline Cleaver, Associate Deputy Secretary, Curriculum, Pathways & Progress | Te Poutāhū (Curriculum Centre)

Refreshing 'The New Zealand Curriculum'

Whakapapa and indicative timeline

Significant change to the national curriculum for schooling is needed to make it equitable and fit for purpose now and in the future. The crucial areas needing the greatest change were being clear about the important learning that all akonga need, and honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

Throughout the refresh we are also seeking views from akonga, parents and whanau, and the wider community including hapu and iwi as well as business and employers.

Take a look at the indicative timeline below for opportunities to get involved. 

For any questions about the refresh of ‘The New Zealand Curriculum’, get in touch with the team at NationalCurriculum.Refresh@education.govt.nz.

Download the leaflet for a quick overview of why and how we’re refreshing 'The New Zealand Curriculum', and the timeline: Refresh of The New Zealand Curriculum [PDF, 1.6 MB]

Accessible version of the timeline [DOCX, 20 KB]

Have Your Say: Draft social sciences content

Have Your Say: Draft social sciences content transcript

The refresh of ‘The New Zealand Curriculum’ offers a once in a generation opportunity for a curriculum that is shaped around the learner – their voice, needs, and aspirations.

As part of the refresh, we’re seeking feedback on the draft social sciences content – and we want to hear from you.

We’re after one to two staff members to represent each school. They’ll complete a registration form (below) and attend an online workshop.

At this workshop, we’ll provide representatives with information so that they can facilitate a feedback session in your staffroom. Following this, everyone will have the opportunity to complete a survey giving your school’s feedback on the draft content.

Want to have your say and make your voice heard? Let’s refresh ‘The New Zealand Curriculum' together.

Consultation will be open until Friday 3 June.

By ākonga for ākonga: The Vision for Young People

NZSL video

Full audio video

By ākonga for ākonga: The Vision for Young People Transcript

(Background music: relaxed reggae with occasional brass instruments heard throughout. Young person with septum ring speaking to camera in the middle of the screen with a plain background).
The Vision for Young People is a guiding star that shows us how we want to use our curriculum to support young people.
(Young man with a grey t-shirt speaking to camera in the middle of the screen with a plain background).
If we are to make decisions about our education system, about our young people, we need to have our young people at the table.
(Young women with glasses speaking to camera in the middle of the screen with a poster in the background).
I really hope that the vision creates an environment in schools where young people don't have to leave their identities at the gates and they can feel that every part of them is welcome and every part of them is celebrated.
(Blurry artwork appears on the entire screen. A hand holding a card stating “A vision for young people” appears from the bottom of the screen and moves upward. A young women appears in the middle of the screen wearing a blue gingham dress and speaks to camera with a plain background).
He rōpū taiohi The Youth Advisory Group, ā, e whia ngā wā i roto i te tau ka whakakao
(A blank screen appears and four hands, all holding an image, move inward from each corner. The images are placed in the centre and showcase young people collaborating around a table with paper, notes, and each participant wearing a name tag. Nine hands appear from the right corner, clockwise around the screen, each holding a cartoon image of a person with their full name).
ngā taiohi o te rōpū nō ngā hau e whā o Aotearoa.
(Voice of a young man is heard).
Ordinary young people with a dream or with experiences
(Screen cuts to the young man with a grey t-shirt speaking to camera).
that they can bring to the table to really voice change.
(Screen cuts back to blurry artwork with a hand holding a card that reads “The New Zealand curriculum refresh”. Screen cuts to young women in blue gingham dress speaking to camera).
Kua tuhia e mātou tētahi tauākī Matakite mō The New Zealand Curriculum.
(Screen cuts back to young women with glasses speaking to camera).
So the vision will be used to guide the writing of the curriculum and every aspect of the curriculum refresh will be designed to support the realisation of the vision.
(Screen cuts to white background with a brown book being placed down and opened. Colourful, artistic drawings of people with speech bubbles appear with felt pens, sticky notes and a pen surrounding the frame. A close up of the image appears with the text “Eight learning areas are being refreshed” and “Our vision will touch everything in the curriculum”).
So we started talking about these things that we wanted to see and what we wanted the country to look like and what we wanted education to look like.
(Screen cuts back to the young person with a septum ring).
Something that I noticed about the curriculum as it is now is that it seems as though it was designed to fit one ideal young person
(Screen cuts back to the book with a page being turned to show other illustrations with quotes).
and what I wanted for The Vision for Young People was to guide the curriculum refresh to be something that fits everyone who needs it in the way that they need it to be.
(Screen cuts to a young man with glasses speaking in the middle of the screen with a plain background).
While being rangatahi centred also
(Screen cuts to a close up of the illustrations with speech bubbles stating “I feel like I belong”, “I accept and acknowledge people from different backgrounds and perspectives” and “Inclusive of all. Everyone can see themselves in it”).
included those who were out of the mainstream education or had additional learning needs, allowed them to see themselves in this statement and their aspirations.
(Screen cuts back to young women with glasses).
In the education system currently there's a lot of variability
(Screen cuts back to the book with a hand turning the page with more illustrations and quotes displayed. A close up of the illustrations states “Honouring Te Tiriti…” and “I understand my role in honouring Te Tiriti O Waitangi”.
about how Te Tiriti is taught and some people might know the history of Te Tiriti but they might not know what it looks like to honour Te Tiriti obligations.
(Screen cuts to a young man in a white t-shirt speaking in the middle of the screen with a plain background).
It just needed more inclusiveness of rangitahi for different perspectives
(Screen cuts to close up of illustrations with text stating “Bicultural and inclusive framework group”, “Language” and “Mataiaho, bring the threads together”. Screen cuts back to blurry animation and a hand appears from the right holding a card that reads “How we wrote it”).
from different nationalities where their reo their language are heard differently but are seen as one.
(Screen cuts back to young women with glasses).
So once we came up with kind of sticky notes upon sticky notes and ideas everywhere,
(Screen cuts to a white background with a hand placing a large illustration of a tree with young people underneath looking upwards and surrounded by native flora. The statement “Writing a draft vision for young people. A co-design process with young people at the centre” is written in the tree’s leaves. Animations of people and quotes are placed onto and surrounding the tree illustration).
we started to refine it a little bit more and group them into categories.
(Voice over changes to a different speaker).
And we came out with 100 statements and ended up whittling that down to just ten
(Screen cuts to the speaker who is the young person with a septum ring).
and that's what we used to create the vision.
(Screen cuts to a blurry image of the tree illustration with a hand coming from the top and holding a card that reads “And the vision is…”. Screen cuts back to illustration of the tree with quotes and people around it, presented to camera on an angle. Close ups of the image appear as the text is read. Audio of a young man states the following).
We the rangatahi of Aotearoa know our society is collective.
(The voice of a different young man states the following).
Our wellbeing is collective.
(The voice of a young women is heard with the following statement).
And we have a collective responsibility to each other.
(Audio changes to a different young man).
We are strong in our identities, languages, cultures and values
(Audio changes to a different person).
so that we can confidently carry who we are wherever we go.
(Young man states the following).
We have a strong sense of belonging which builds the foundation to be courageous, confident and curious.
(Different young man is heard).
Understanding that success can look different for all of us.
(Different speaker).
This means we can learn and grow from our setbacks while surrounded by the support we need.
(Young women states the following).
We can navigate the knowledge we receive using our heads and our hearts to make decisions.
(Young man states the following).
We understand our roles in honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi.
(Change in speaker).
We are kaitiaki of our environment.
(Young man speaking).
We accept, acknowledge and appreciate our different backgrounds and perspectives.
(Young women speaking).
We positively contribute
(Young man speaking).
to our communities,
(Young person speaking).
Aotearoa
(Young man speaking).
and beyond.
(Hand appears on screen with a card that reads “What this means to us”. Screen cuts back to young person with septum ring).
Something that I'm really proud of with The Vision for Young People is that although it acknowledges and inspires the resilience that we have within ourselves, it also reminds us that we are part of our communities and encourages us to lean on those communities for support when and where we need it.
(Screen cuts back to the young man with glasses).
They have acknowledged that we can learn from our setbacks and that our setbacks don't define us, they help us grow and become a better version of ourselves.
(Screen cuts back to the young women with glasses).
I'm also really excited about the inclusion of the statement, “We understand our role in honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi”.
(Screen cuts back to the young man with a grey t-shirt).
There's a statement around our students being courageous, being confident, and that all comes back to that sense of belonging. As young people, we all want to belong, not only in the education system but in society.
(Screen cuts back to the young women with glasses).
It's really important that as many rangatahi as possible give their feedback on this vision
(Screen cuts to close up of the tree illustration that reads “Next: Rangatahi across NZ will have their say too”).
to ensure that it keeps being for young people by young people
(Screen cuts back to the young women with glasses).
and I think that's a really unique opportunity that you should definitely feed into if you have the chance to.
(Screen cuts back to the young women in the blue gingham dress).
Me tomo mai ki ngā mahi. Whakaputaina ō whakaaro. Ka mōhiotia koe hei kaiāwhina i tēnei kaupapa nui. So get involved. Have your say. And be part of making history. So get involved. Have your say. And be part of making history.
(Screen cuts back to the blurry tree illustration with a hand appearing from the top of the screen, holding a card that reads “Have your say”, followed by a hand appearing from the bottom of the screen holding a card that reads “www.haveyoursay.co.nz/vision-youth-survey”. Screen changes to white with a black Te Tāhuhu O Te Mātauranga Ministry of Education logo).

For the first time ever, we have a draft Vision for Young People written by ākonga for ākonga within the refresh of 'The New Zealand Curriculum'.

Now we want to hear from students across the country.

We’re asking you to share the draft Vision for Young People with your students.

After reviewing the draft statement, students will be given the opportunity to complete a survey and provide feedback. Depending on how old the students are, you may need to support them to do this.

Consultation will be open until Friday 3 June.

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