Māori Immersion Allowance

You’ll be paid a Māori Immersion Allowance if you meet the criteria set out in your employment agreement.

Primary principals

If you’re required to teach in te Reo Māori immersion classes at levels 1, 2 or 3 you’ll receive an allowance of $4,000 per annum. A further allowance may be payable following 3 years’ continuous service.

The allowance is set out in clause 6.2.6 of the collective agreement.

Clause 6.2.6 - Primary Principals' Collective Agreement

Primary teachers

If you’re required to teach in te Reo Māori immersion classes at levels 1, 2 or 3 you’ll receive an allowance of $4,000 per annum. Further allowances are paid once you’ve completed 3 years’ and 6 years’ continuous service.

The allowance is set out in clause 3.17 of the collective agreement.

Clause 3.17 – Primary Teachers’ Collective Agreement

Secondary teachers

If you’re required to use te Reo Māori for at least 6 hours per week in approved Māori immersion programmes at levels 1, 2 or 3 you’ll receive an allowance of $4,000 per annum.

The allowance is set out in clause 4.18 of the collective agreement.

Clause 4.18 – Secondary Teachers’ Collective Agreement

Area school principals

If you’re required to teach in te Reo Māori immersion classes at levels 1, 2 or 3 you’ll receive an allowance of $4,000 per annum. Further allowances are paid once you’ve completed 3 years’ and 6 years’ continuous service.

The allowance is set out in clause 3.5 of the collective agreement.

Clause 3.5 – Area School Principals’ Collective Agreement

Area school teachers

If you required to use te Reo Māori for at least 6 hours per week in approved Māori immersion programmes at levels 1, 2 or 3 you’ll receive an allowance of $4,000 per annum. Further allowances are paid once you’ve completed 3 years’ and 6 years’ continuous service.

The allowance is set out in clause 3.14 of the collective agreement.

Clause 3.14 – Area School Teachers’ Collective Agreement

Definition of levels 1-3 of Māori immersion

Level 1

Level 1: Maintenance Programmes (81 per cent to 100 per cent immersion):

  • Te reo Māori is the principal language of communication and instruction.
  • The principal curriculum is taught entirely in Māori.

(It’s expected that all students in the programme will interact freely in Māori.)

Level 2

Level 2: Development Programmes (51 per cent to 80 per cent immersion):

  • Te reo Māori is, for most of the time, the language of communication and instruction.
  • English is accepted as a temporary language of instruction and communication.
  • There’s an agreement between the school and parents that the programme will achieve a particular level of immersion over a specified period of time.
  • The level of fluency of the teacher will vary considerably, from not very fluent to native-like fluency.
  • There’s a reliance on Kaiarahi Reo to increase the amount of spoken Māori in the programme.

(It’s expected that not all students in the programme will interact freely in Māori.)

Level 3

Level 3: Emerging Programmes (31 per cent to 50 per cent immersion):

  • English is the main language of communication and instruction.
  • The teacher can communicate at a basic level of Māori, but has difficulty instructing in Māori.
  • Māori is used as the classroom management language.
  • An increase in the level of immersion is restricted by the level of fluency of the teacher.
  • A Kaiarahi Reo is usually the only fluent speaker in the programme.

Note: A school which is offering Māori as a subject only would not meet the level 3 immersion criteria.

Last reviewed: Has this been useful? Give us your feedback