Transferring data between schools

Use the Student Record Transfer (SRT) system to electronically transfer student data between schools.

About SRT

Use Student Record Transfer (SRT) to transfer student records electronically between schools, and between any kind of Student Management System (SMS). There’s no need to re-enter a student’s record each time they move schools, and the records can contain much more information.

Benefits of SRT

With SRT you can transfer much more detailed information from your students’ files such as their:

  • records from ENROL and the pre-enrolment register
  • assessment records
  • caregiver information, and
  • medical, assessment and attendance records.

Benefits include:

  • saving administration time and cost
  • earlier and better information about student transfers, for better decision making on matters like resourcing, staffing and timetabling
  • secure, accurate transfer of data  all transfers are logged both in SRT and in the school's SMS.

How SRT works

How SRT works video — Youtube website (external link)

How SRT works  transcript of the Youtube video [DOC, 33 KB]

Sensitive data records

Tell your school’s community you’re using SRT to transfer student records. You don’t need each caregiver’s express permission. But if a record is sensitive you or the student’s caregivers may not wish to have it transferred electronically.

How to get SRT for your school

SRT is available free from all the Ministry’s software vendors. Talk to the vendor who supplied your SMS or contact the Ministry for advice.

Phone: 04 463 7666

Email: MLE.Project@education.govt.nz

The decision to use SRT should be made by the principal, the leadership team and the person who does your ENROL uploads.

Privacy and data transfer

SRT meets the requirements of the Privacy Act 1993 and the Education Act 1989. Misuse can lead to prosecution.

Find how the Privacy Act affects data transfer on page 31 of ‘Privacy in Schools: A guide to the Privacy Act for principals, teachers and boards of trustees’. It’s available on the Privacy Commissioner’s website.

Books and Articles — Privacy Commissioner website (external link)

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