Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori questions and answers

Background

What are Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

Our national curriculum sets the direction for teaching and learning in Aotearoa New Zealand schools in two documents: Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, the curriculum for Māori medium schools and settings, and The New Zealand Curriculum for English medium schools.

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori support Te Marautanga o Aotearoa by establishing clear and consistent expectations for kōrero (oral language), pānui (reading), tuhituhi (writing) and pāngarau (mathematics) skills and knowledge that students in years 1-8 need to learn at different stages of their schooling. They signal important points to watch for to guide teaching, learning, and assessment practices. This is so students can access all areas of the curriculum, and raise achievement so young people leave kura or school with the qualifications they need to succeed.

The implementation of Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori includes developing plain language reporting to parents and whānau, developing literacy and numeracy assessment tools for the Māori medium, and professional development for teachers, principals and boards of trustees.

What did we do during the consultation for Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori have been developed and drafted by Māori medium leaders in te reo (literacy) and pāngarau (numeracy).

From March to June 2010, the Ministry of Education consulted in-depth with teachers, principals, boards of trustee members, education groups, and iwi in the Māori medium sector.

From March to June 2010, there was consultation with parents and whānau about plain language reporting in relation to the draft Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. We used a range of examples as the basis for the consultation.

The consultation analysis reports are available on the Ministry of Education’s website.
We reviewed and refined the draft Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori using this feedback and published the final Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori in late 2010. All kura and Māori medium settings will use them from February 2011.

Read more about the consultation.

How was information gathered to assist with finalising Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

Information was gathered from 42 kura and Māori medium settings using the draft Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. All Māori medium principals, teachers and boards of trustees within these schools and settings were provided with opportunities to participate in workshops, which contributed to further developing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

Read more about information gathering.

Why is the timeline for Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori different from the English medium National Standards?

The Māori medium sector is relatively young and there is less information available to design Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori than we had for the English medium National Standards. And so, the Ministry of Education used the longer time to gather information to ensure Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori are set at appropriate curriculum levels of progress and achievement and to ensure they align with Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

Boards and principals

What is the timeline for implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

In 2011 teachers must report to parents and whānau in writing and using plain language, at least twice a year on their child’s progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

Boards of trustees must set Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori targets in their 2012 charters. They will report against these targets in their 2013 annual reports.

What must boards report in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

The new National Administration Guidelines (NAGs) require schools to report school-level data on Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori in the board’s annual report under three headings:

  • School strengths and identified areas for improvement.
  • The basis for identifying areas for improvement.
  • Planned actions to lift achievement.

Report in the board’s annual report on:

  • The number and proportion of students at, above, below or well below the standards including by Māori, Pasifika and by gender (where this does not breach an individual’s privacy).
  • How students are progressing against the standards as well as how they are achieving.

Read more about the NAGs (external link) .

Which standards should schools and settings be using?

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori support te reo and pāngarau teaching and learning across Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, and the National Standards support literacy and numeracy teaching and learning across the New Zealand Curriculum.

Schools with both English medium and Māori medium settings are likely to be using both the New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa. An individual students’ learning plan will come under only one curriculum, not both. Bilingual schools and settings will also need to decide which of the curricula will set the direction for learning for their individual students.

Teachers of students that have their learning programmes based on Te Marautanga o Aotearoa should be using Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori to plan learning programmes and report students’ progress and achievement.

Teachers of students that have their learning programmes based on the New Zealand Curriculum should be using the National Standards to set the direction for learning and reporting students’ progress and achievement.

What support will the Ministry provide?

The Ministry’s contractors who provide training to Boards of Trustees will support school governance to understand their roles and responsibilities, particularly in relation to supporting their staff learning needs and the reporting processes.

Schools can continue to access support for designing their marautanga-ā-kura (local curriculum). They were asked to complete an Expression of Interest so that that targeted support could be arranged for 2011.

Professional learning and development (PLD) for Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori will be implemented in a variety of ways to ensure that all kura and Māori-medium settings can participate. They include participating in:

  • An in-depth professional development programme administered by facilitators throughout 2011. Kura and Māori-medium settings that choose to participate in this programme will have identified this as their priority PLD programme for 2011.
  • Regional workshops hosted by a range of In-service Teacher Educators (ISTEs) in all regions throughout the year. Kura and Māori-medium settings that choose to participate in this will be advised of the focus of these and when they occur.
  • Workshops as required. These workshops will be designed to assist those who already have a clear understanding of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori, and would like to access support in specific areas only.

Schools can also continue to get support from:

  • Resource Teachers Māori
  • School Support Services (SSS) advisors
  • Te Marautanga o Aotearoa Regional Facilitators.

How does Te Āhua o te Ākonga ka puta (Graduate Profile) relate to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori will support a school to provide appropriate learning and teaching programmes so that the vision and aspirations within the marautanga-a-kura are achieved.

What can school leadership teams do to prepare for implementing Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

  • Clarify with your community which curriculum statement, Te Marautanga o Aotearoa or The New Zealand Curriculum, will set the direction for learning for students in your kura or Māori-medium settings.
  • Plan how your kura or Māori-medium settings will work with Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori from term 1 2011.
  • Identify Board of Trustees, school leaders’ and teachers’ learning needs and plan how you want to participate in workshops with the Ministry about Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori within your region.
  • Access information and support about Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori and professional learning and development opportunities from the Ministry’s website www.tmoa.tki.org.nz (external link) . Alternatively, contact your Regional Ministry office.

Will initial teacher education courses cover Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

Teacher education providers are independent organisations and design their own courses. However, the courses must allow graduates to meet the teacher registration criteria set by the New Zealand Teachers Council. The Council’s Graduating Teacher Standards Aotearoa Standard Five is: graduating teachers use evidence to promote learning requires that graduating teachers:

  • Gather, analyse and use assessment information to improve learning and inform planning.
  • Know how to communicate assessment information appropriately to learners, their parents/caregivers and staff.

Setting goals

Do schools and teachers, in consultation with whānau, need to set learning goals with students for Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori for 2011?

All students should know what goals they are working towards in kōrero (oral language), pānui (reading), tuhituhi (writing) and pāngarau (mathematics) and why those goals are important. Previous years’ assessment information will help you know your students’ abilities. For some students, you may wish to revisit their progress and achievement before setting goals with them.

What about goals in the other learning areas? Do students need these as well?

Yes students should have goals across all learning areas. Helping students set their own learning goals helps them understand what they know and what they need to learn. They also take greater ownership of their learning.

Assessment

Which standards should schools and settings be using?

Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori support te reo and pāngarau teaching and learning across Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, and the National Standards support literacy and numeracy teaching and learning across the New Zealand Curriculum.

Schools with both English medium and Māori medium settings are likely to be using both Te Marautanga o Aotearoa and The New Zealand Curriculum. An individual students’ learning plan will come under only one curriculum, not both. Bilingual schools and settings will also need to decide which of the curricula will set the direction for learning for their individual students.

Teachers of students that have their learning programmes based on Te Marautanga o Aotearoa should be using Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori to plan learning programmes and report students’ progress and achievement.

Teachers of students that have their learning programmes based on the New Zealand Curriculum should be using the National Standards to set the direction for learning and reporting students’ progress and achievement.

How often do teachers judge progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

The Ministry of Education has developed teacher guidelines outlining learning progressions, which include descriptions of student progress and achievement and are linked to the levels in Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

Many teachers and students already make regular judgments on progress based on assessment. These ongoing informal and formal judgments will contribute to overall teacher judgments made for the purpose of reporting to parents and whānau, in writing, (at least) twice during the year, and for reporting school level data in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. For more see the information on teacher guidelines.

What is an overall teacher judgment?

An overall teacher judgment is a judgment made about a student’s progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori. An overall teacher judgment should be based on the variety of evidence teachers already collect, such as the student’s work, peer and self-assessment, everyday classroom observation, and assessment activities both formal and informal. This involves drawing on and applying the evidence gathered up to a particular point in time in order to make an overall judgment about a student’s progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

Putting the child and teacher judgment as a first step is important. It is not about automatically assessing each child in the classroom in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori for that year.

Most importantly, assessment should benefit the student, involve the student, be suited to the student, be valid and fair and support their teaching and learning goals.

Do teachers assess students at certain ages or at the same time as we do currently?

No. Teachers are not expected to assess students at certain times because they already assess their students throughout the year. NAG 2A requires teachers to make an overall teacher judgment at least twice a year.

When is an overall teacher judgment made?

Overall teacher judgments need to be made for particular purposes, for example for moderation, for reporting to parents and for reporting school level data.
The overall teacher judgments for reporting school level data must be made at the end of students’ first, second and third years at school and then at the end of each year for years 4-8.

How do teachers know their overall teacher judgment is valid and reliable?

Teachers will make their overall teacher judgments using their knowledge and observations of each student and suitable assessment information. Observations and examples of student’s work are very important in forming overall teacher judgments. We will guide you on aligning appropriate and accessible assessment tools to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

At the same time, schools will be strengthening their moderation processes to help teachers make these judgments collegially. By discussing their interpretations and judgments in relation to the range of assessment evidence with Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori teachers will build consistency in their overall teacher judgments.

Do teachers have to compare students to their class/school/other schools?

The only requirement is to assess students’ progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

Are teachers required to report on Te Reo Pākehā, the English language learning area of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, in relation to the standards?

All kura and other Level 1 and 2 Māori medium settings are required to provide programmes in Te Reo Pākehā. Teachers in these kura and settings are not required to assess or report their children’s progress and achievement in relation to the national standards. However, the national literacy standards for use in English medium will provide useful information on students’ progress and achievement in Te Reo Pākehā.

English language learners may also use the English language learning progressions to report progress and achievement to parents and whānau. Material to support Te Reo Pākehā will be available by mid 2011.

Students’ starting levels of achievement will vary, as will their progress. We will expect the same long term outcome – for students to be poised to achieve at NCEA Level 2.

What are level 1 and 2 immersion settings?

Levels 1 and 2 immersion settings are those in which more than half the teaching and learning takes place in and through te reo Māori.

Level 1 programmes are 81–100 percent in and through te reo Māori

Level 2 programmes are 51–80 percent in and through te reo Māori

Will students with special education needs be assessed in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori?

Most students with special education needs will be able to progress and achieve in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

A very small group of students with high and complex needs is supported through the Ongoing and Reviewable Resourcing Schemes (ORRS) or the Supplementary Learning Support Service. These students are likely to learn long-term within Level 1 of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa. Their progress will be assessed in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori as part of their individual education plans.

Boards of trustees will continue to report on these students separately in their charters and annual reports.

What about students who transfer between schools part way through their education?

When a new student starts a school, whether in a kura or Māori medium setting or an English medium setting their previous report will show their progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori or the National Standards.

This evidence helps the new teacher professionally judge the appropriate starting place for this student.

Reporting

What reports do teachers give parents?

From February 2011, teachers will report to parents in writing, using plain language, at least twice a year, about how their child is progressing and achieving in relation to Te Marautanga o Aotearoa using Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

The National Assessment Guidelines (NAGs) require twice yearly reporting of both progress and achievement. We encourage schools to report on:

  • The student’s current learning goals.
  • The student’s progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.
  • What the school and teacher will do to support the student’s learning.
  • What parents and whānau can do to support the child’s learning.
  • The student’s assessment results.

Is there a template that teachers have to use for reporting to parents?

As long as parents receive written reports of their child's progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori in plain language, at least twice a year, schools can develop their own reports, modify existing ones or use templates provided by the Ministry of Education. School reports should reflect what the school community wants.

There are some sample reporting graphs online [PDF, 619 KB].

Are teachers going to get advice or examples of plain language reports from the Ministry?

The Ministry of Education will publish examples on TKI during 2011.

Do teachers have to report on other areas of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa as well?

Schools must report to students and their parents on individual students’ progress and achievement across all areas of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

If a school already report to parents more than twice a year – should it be doing less?

Reporting twice a year is a minimum requirement. Many schools report more often than twice a year. Every school’s community is different and has different needs. The most important thing is finding out what works for your community and responding appropriately.

What will the Ministry do to educate students and parents about the reports?

The Ministry’s Te Marautanga o Aotearoa website (www.tmoa.tki.org.nz (external link) ) will have information in plain language for parents on how Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori reporting works.

Teachers and schools can also use this information for students, their parents and whānau (link to whānau section of web) – by printing it or linking to it from the school’s website, and by discussing it with them.

We recommend that school leaders and teachers talk to parents and whānau about the reporting process to find what is most effective for your community, and how they can support their child’s learning.

Most of our parents have English as their first language. Should schools report to them in te reo Māori?

Reporting in plain language is part of the requirement. Many schools already ask their parents and whānau which language they would prefer to receive their child’s report in. So check with your community.

How can schools assist parents and whānau in understanding the report?

As required, schools will provide written reports to each student’s parents. However, it is critical that all parents are clear about their child’s progress and achievement and so conversation will help to clarify the report and plan how the parent and school can help the student with the next learning steps. We want schools to build excellent relationships with students and their parents and whānau. Schools need to use a range of ways to communicate with their communities.

What about those students who are not meeting Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori year after year, yet making progress?

It is important that students, parents and whānau have a realistic understanding of the student‘s progress and achievement and that the student stays motivated to learn.
Reporting and celebrating progress is important, as is indicating the possibilities of achieving higher levels in the future and what is needed to achieve them.

What about students who aren’t at school for significant periods of time, for whatever reason?

Reports to parents and whānau should be very clear about any circumstances which may have affected student performance. This includes prolonged absences.

Parents and whānau

What reports will parents and whānau get?

From January 2011, teachers are required to report to parents in writing, using plain language, at least twice a year, about how your child is progressing and achieving in relation to Te Marautanga o Aotearoa using Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.

We encourage schools to report on:

  • Your child’s current learning goals.
  • Your child’s progress and achievement in relation to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori.
  • What the school and teacher will do to support your child’s learning.
  • What parents and whānau can do to support your child’s learning.
  • Your child’s assessment results.

Is there a template that schools have to use for reporting to whānau?

Schools can develop their own reports, modify existing ones or use templates provided by the Ministry of Education (provide link). School reports should reflect what the school community wants.

Will whānau get a report on our child’s progress in all areas of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa?

Schools must report to each child and their parents on the child’s progress and achievement across all areas of Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

Where can parents and whānau go to get information about the reports?

The Ministry’s website will have information in plain language for parents and whānau on how Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori reporting works.

We recommend that parents and whānau, principals and teachers talk about the reporting process to find what is most effective for your community, and how you can support your child’s learning together.

Do schools have to report to whānau in te reo Māori?

Reporting in plain language is part of the requirement. Many schools already ask their parents and whānau which language they would prefer to receive their child’s report in. Boards, principals and teachers in consultation with the parents and whānau will decide which language will be used in reports.

What assistance is there for whānau to understand the written reports?

As required, schools will provide written reports to each student’s parents. It is important that every parent is clear about their child’s progress and achievement. They can expect schools and teachers to work with them to ensure they understand the content of the report.

For example, a conversation will help to clarify a child’s report and the plan for how the parent and teacher can help the child with the next learning steps.

Excellent relationships between whānau, their children, and their children’s teachers are important in supporting learning.

Schools need to use a range of ways to communicate effectively with their communities. We recommend that parents and whānau, and principals and teachers talk about the reporting process to find what is most effective.

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